All posts by Christine Lindner

Hello, I'm a Adobe Captivate user that develops E-Learning courses for the electrical trades. I'm trained in Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Flash. But my passion is being creative. I make cards by papercrafting. I also watercolor, pastel, and use colored pencils. So I mix medias. I give my art away and teach. I love to share. Are you interested?

WordPress Plugins: Creative Commons Configurator

There is a WordPress Plugin available to put copyright information on your posts and pages automatically. It is called Creative Commons Configurator. Once you download and activate the Plugin you just do a few steps to set it up and then it will put a creative commons license on your posts/pages for you.

The page for setting it up is displayed below. It is very simple to do once you activate the Plugin. You decide whether you wish to share your post freely or not. There is the option about sharing the license internationally or more locally in a drop down menu. Once you have made those selections you use the license button.

Creative Commons Selections

At this point you can see that you are actually deciding to choose a license that will be attached to your post. It asks you whether you want to proceed. Continue reading WordPress Plugins: Creative Commons Configurator

Interview with Chief Steve Moody

Steve MoodyChief Steve Moody is a Fire Fighter with a passion for sharing his experiences in WordPress. He has been a Chief Fire Fighter in Eldorado, Kansas for one year now after moving from another district for several years. He has been a Chief Fire Fighter for 16 years, 36 years as a fire fighter but is trained in EMT too. He has a personal WordPress.com site called Chief Steven D. Moody.

Chief Steve Moody

I happen to have chosen him to interview since I have worked with fire fighters for several years and couldn’t see them having the time to write down their stories but I sure did want to know them. So I was eager to interview Steve. Steve was humble. He said his son would probably be more interesting to interview about WordPress since his son got him started. But he was wrong. Continue reading Interview with Chief Steve Moody

How to Create a Contact Form with the Jetpack WordPress Plugin

WordPress.com has a built in contact form available to self-hosted WordPress sites via the Jetpack WordPress Plugin</a .  A contact form allows you to give your readers the ability to get in touch with you from your page or post. 

From a post or Page, look above the toolbar for a button labeled "Contact Form."

Contact Form Button

Contact forms are a great way to get in touch with your readers, without giving out your personal email address, but don’t just limit yourself to thinking about contact forms for communicating with readers. The Contact Form feature of Jetpack allows you to set up many types of forms to increase interactivity on your site.

Here are instructions on how to create a contact form with the Jetpack WordPress Plugin and on WordPress.com. Continue reading How to Create a Contact Form with the Jetpack WordPress Plugin

How to Backup and Restore WordPress Theme Options

Read on if you are an advanced WordPress user. 

You set up your WordPress Theme just the way you want with Theme options, all set, now you need to backup or restore. What do you do?

There is a plug-n-play snippet to create if your theme isn’t set up for backup and restore. The snippet called Backup/Restore Theme Options that can be seen in action if you look at the ShapeSpace Theme. Continue reading How to Backup and Restore WordPress Theme Options

ImageInject WordPress Plugin Updates

Previously known as WP inject, ImageInject is a dynamic free WordPress Plugin that allows you to insert images into your WordPress post very easily and quickly. You can by simply searching a huge and free database containing millions of photos with a couple of clicks and have an image added to your post.

The images in ImageInject are sourced from Pixabay and Flickr.  More sources to come in the future. When the images are imported the source information is automatically entered into your post for you. Continue reading ImageInject WordPress Plugin Updates

Web Accessibility: Small Flashing Objects and Text

The criteria for presenting small flashing objects and text on a web page varies depending upon the reference you use when it comes to defining what amount of flashing and moving is permitted on the web within the web accessibility laws. Of course, this changes depending upon which country’s laws are being followed as well.

The important point to consider is that you don’t let small flashing objects flash faster than 3 times per second. According to W3C.org:

The criterion is 25% of any 10 degree visual field, any single flashing event on a screen (there is no other flashing on a screen) that is smaller than a contiguous area of 21,824 sq pixels (any shape), would pass the General and Red Flash Thresholds.

Small Object Sized

That is an image the size of 341 x 246 pixels. The definition of a “general flash” or a “red flash” are defined below in the threshold definition by WCAG 2.0 Recommendation as:

a flash or rapidly changing image sequence is below the threshold (i.e., content passes) if any of the following are true:

  • there are no more than three general flashes and / or no more than three red flashes within any one-second period; or
  • the combined area of flashes occurring concurrently occupies no more than a total of .006 steradians within any 10 degree visual field on the screen (25% of any 10 degree visual field on the screen) at typical viewing distance

Squizlabs’ HTML_CodeSniffer describes this as:

The definition of small enough is given as “25% of any 10 degree visual field on the screen… at typical viewing distance”. This size, therefore, depends on the screen size, resolution, and viewing distance. The higher the resolution or screen size, the larger the permitted area.

Objects that flash and blink on the web page run the risk of initiating optically-induced seizures in visitors. According to WebAIM, no element should flash at a rate of 2 flashes per 55 cycles per second.  Using their 508 checklist, one or more elements that flicker on a page that does not meet this criteria is considered to fail, and will put someone at risk who is sensitive of optically-induced seizures.

W3C Recommendation 2.3.1 states that:

Three Flashes or Below Threshold: web pages do not contain anything that flashes more than three times in any one second period.

The intent is to reduce the chance of seizures since some people are sensitive to flashing on screens. This includes people with photosensitive epilepsy as well as photosensitive seizure disorders.

W3C goes on to further explain this is detail so that a writer could fully understand how critical it is to make sure accessibility standards are met. The other resources all show that optical seizures are the main reason why that this criteria is maintained. These sources differ in the timing of the flashing time limit but they agree about the results. So whatever source you choose consider your reader.

The web standards for moving and flashing text for web accessibility are found in Section 508 1194.22 (i), WCAG 1.0 A 7.1, and WCAG 2.0 A 2.3.1.

References and Resources

WordPress Words: Plugins

WordPress Plugin: A WordPress Plugin is a program, or a set of one or more functions, written in the PHP scripting language, that adds a specific set of features or services to the WordPress weblog, which can be seamlessly integrated with the weblog using access points and methods provided by the WordPress Plugin Application Program Interface (API).
Writing a WordPress Plugin – WordPress Codex

WordPress Plugins are a set of files that have to be installed and activated in order to work. Don’t confuse WordPress Plugins with plug-ins for light bulbs or electronic devices. WordPress Plugins extend the functionality of WordPress, allowing it do do more. Continue reading WordPress Words: Plugins

WordPress Words: Blockquotes

A blockquote is an HTML tag for designating a section of quoted text.
WordPress 24-Hour Trainer by George Plumley

Blockquotes are used for text both on the web and printed material. You use them to surround the text of material you are bringing into your article that is written by someone else that you are quoting.

As the reader reads through a web article, they must identify clearly the difference between the original content and copied content.

There are two ways to quote from other sources. You may add the information in quotes, just like in traditional media such as how Lorelle VanFossen explains that it’s important to “learn how to link and quote from published material to stay safe and on the right side of International Copyright Laws.” That example includes a link to the source and the quoted content within quote marks, identifying it as content not in the author’s words.

In a blockquote, the citation link may come before, after, or within the blockquote. Here are examples. Continue reading WordPress Words: Blockquotes

Take care when choosing an eCommerce Plugin

There are several factors to consider when choosing an eCommerce plugin for WordPress. Patrick Mwachugu outlines them in his overview in his article of “Factors to consider about these WordPress Plugins”. Patrick reviews WooCommerce, Easy Digital Downloads and Get Shopped as well as naming other examples. When choosing a Plugin it is a good idea to read his article for the positives and negatives before you decide which direction to go with your website.

Whether picking out a Plugin to work straight off at download or one that will need customization, you have decisions to make before you pick the Plugin that will work for you and your business. Marketing, shipping, managing orders, and payment options are some of the items to consider and this article is one place to start for your WordPress needs. He points out that you need to also consider what you are capable of doing with your website in order to be successful as well. This is a one place to reference before you pick out a eCommerce Plugin for WordPress.