All posts by Traci Petty

I am currently a student at Clark College working on an AA degree and taking a web development class using WordPress.

WordPress Plugin: MetaSlider

Meta Slider is an easy to use WordPress slider plugin made by Matcha Labs. As the most popular WordPress slider plugin, with over 600,000+ active installs, it allows you to create SEO optimized responsive slideshows with Nivo Slider, Flex Slider, Coin Slider and Responsive Slides.

There are a variety of slider options with this WordPress Plugin.

  • Flex Slider 2 – Responsive, 2 transition effects, carousel mode
  • Nivo Slider – Responsive, 16 transition effects, 4 themes
  • Responsive Slides – Responsive & incredibly light weight
  • Coin Slider – 4 transition effects

Continue reading WordPress Plugin: MetaSlider

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Interview with Bob Passaro

Profile picture of Bob Passaro.Bob Passaro is a partner in the branding/web development agency Figoli Quinn & Associates. He lives in Eugene, Oregon.

The following is from a phone conversation with Bob Passaro on November 20, 2015.

Bob’s Experience with WordPress

Bob has been using WordPress for around 6 years. His first development job using WordPress was for NW Book Lovers. The website is still active. Even though he has offered to redesign the site, the owners are happy with the original design. Continue reading Interview with Bob Passaro

WordPress News: How Many Plugins is Too Many?

If you like to take polls, Jeff Starr from Digging Into WordPress is asking “How Many Plugins is Too Many?

As of November 20, 2015 there have been 526 votes cast and showing the following results.

  • 42% say 11-25 plugins are a reasonable number for a site.
  • 38% say the fewer the better, but 1-10 plugins are essential.
  • 11% say it’s impossible to build anything without 26 – 50 plugins.
  • 4% agree 15-100 is the perfect number of plugins for the sites they build.
  • 3% say over 100 is ok, because WordPress can handle anything.
  • Only 1% viewed plugins as the root of all evil and shouldn’t be used.

Many commenters mentioned it’s not about quantity as much as it is about quality.

The problem with this poll is that ONE plugin is too many if it’s badly coded and wrecks the site’s performance, but you can run lots of plugins if they are lightweight. A simple site might have fewer than 10 plugins, but a more complex site is going to have a minimum of 20, just from the extensions added to support e-commerce, events, forms, etc. It’s possible for a site with 50 plugins to run just fine, but I always try not to use more plugins than I really need.
Sallie Goetsch

If you are heading over to cast your vote, please note that they are asking about “typical” WordPress plugins for the poll. If you’re not sure what a WordPress plugin is, or would like to view some recently reviewed plugins, check out the following posts on ClarkWP Magazine.

For More Information:

Article: How to Design with Dyslexia in Mind

Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects 3-7% of the population, and up to 20% may have some degree of the symptoms. It is not an intelligence problem, but considered a cognitive disorder that primarily affects learning, memory, perception, and problem solving. Specifically, it impairs a person’s ability to read. As web designers, we need to be aware of the design choices we make so we don’t make it harder for people with dyslexia to read a website.

Dyslexia Design Decisions

When making design choices we need to consider the needs of the following two groups:

Dyslexic people who use computer speech output technology: Like many visually-impaired users, many dyslexics now rely on computers to read the text to them. Thus pages should be designed to be compatible with most screen readers. All important information should be conveyed in text, as computers can not read or interpret graphic images.

Dyslexics who need clear graphics and distortion-free text: Other dyslexic individuals, who are reading your site on their own, will appreciate clear, simple, and consistent graphic navigational icons. They will be troubled by flashing text, variations in fonts, distracting sounds or animations, and textured or patterned backgrounds.
Dyslexia

Continue reading Article: How to Design with Dyslexia in Mind

How to Use CSS to Stylize Headings in Your WordPress Content

So the extra-large font on the post titles and teeny-tiny text on the headings of Twenty Eleven are not doing it for you? This tutorial will show you how to spice up any theme headings using CSS and discuss the pros and cons of doing so.

Styling Headings with the WordPress Customizer or Appearance Settings

Maybe just changing the font and colors will be enough for you to style the headings.

Experiment with the WordPress Customizer settings in Appearance > Customize. It’s all automatic, so there is no need to know how to code CSS.

Pros: You can customize the appearance of your theme to your exact specifications, though the specifications maybe limited or constrained.

Cons: If you switch themes the fonts will carry over, but the CSS will not. You will also lose your customization if you upgrade your current theme for security reasons. Take a look at the Frequently Asked Questions about Customizer for all the other restrictions. Continue reading How to Use CSS to Stylize Headings in Your WordPress Content

WordPress Words: Footer

The bottom section of a webpage is also known as a footer. This area typically contains the name of the company or organization that publishes the website, along with relevant copyright information. Some websites may also include basic navigation links, such as “About Us,” “Contact,” and “Help.” Corporate website footers often include additional links to “Terms of Use,” “Privacy Guidelines,” and “Advertising” pages as well.
The Tech Terms Dictionary

Example: Scroll down to the footer for additional information about this site. Continue reading WordPress Words: Footer