Tag Archives: screen readers

Web Accessibility: Using the Web With No Eyesight

Almost everyone uses the internet. Browsing websites, purchasing products online, checking bank account balances, or just chatting with friends using social media, are activities that sighted people take for granted. But, how would you accomplish these tasks if you were blind?

Different Modalities

When a sighted person uses the web, they use their eyes to scan the page, and then make a decision where to click their mouse or where text needs to be input such as on a form. Buttons and links are easily discerned. For a blind person, navigating these simple tasks requires an extraordinary amount of time in comparison and relies on whether the website being used is in compliance with W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) and WebAIM (Web Accessibility In Mind) guidelines and international law. Continue reading Web Accessibility: Using the Web With No Eyesight

Web Accessibility: Headings and Section Titles

According to Wikipedia, Web Accessibility refers to the inclusive practice of removing barriers that prevent access to websites by people with disabilities. When sites are correctly designed, developed and edited, all users have equal access to information and functionality.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international community whose mission is to lead the Web to its full potential. They have published Four Principles of Accessibility: Perceivable, Operable, Understandable, and Robust (POUR). You can read more about those standards and you can contact W3C directly for more information. Continue reading Web Accessibility: Headings and Section Titles

Web Accessibility: Links

When you click a link on a website, what is that link? What is it made of? The W3schools website defines a link as “a link between a document and an external resource.” A link is basically an established relationship between one document (HTML, CSS, etc.) and another. A link is one of the many roads to travel on the World Wide Web.

While links are easy to include in a Post or Page, they are too easy. In fact, it is not hard to overlook a very important part of links: web accessibility. According to the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative, web accessibility is defined as an initiative to help “people with disabilities” navigate, use, and contribute to the web. Despite the fact that the initiative is mainly for people with disabilities, web accessibility also helps people without disabilities:

Web accessibility also benefits people without disabilities. For example, a key principle of Web accessibility is designing Web sites and software that are flexible to meet different user needs, preferences, and situations. This flexibility also benefits people without disabilities in certain situations, such as people using a slow Internet connection, people with “temporary disabilities” such as a broken arm, and people with changing abilities due to aging.
W3C Web Accessibility Initiative

Continue reading Web Accessibility: Links