Tag Archives: wordpress advice

WordPress Resources – Who’s Talking?

As WordPress users, we are often stuck looking for help outside of the WordPress owned forums and support options. Going to an outside source can help you gather an outside opinion, talk to advanced users and get guaranteed-honest feedback.

There are many sites all over the internet for this purpose, however, it is important to make sure the sites you are using are professional and have active users and moderators to get you the best answers fast with minimal or no spam. Continue reading WordPress Resources – Who’s Talking?

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WordPress I Class: Students Tell Students What They Need to Know

Clark College’s class isn’t a typical class. It is a class that evolves each quarter with each collection of students. Students contribute tutorial articles to the student-managed and produced online magazine, ClarkWP,  used in the class notes for future student’s education. We call it legacy content.

Among the legacies left behind each quarter is a collection of tips from students completing the course to help new students learn from their mistakes and successes on how to get the most out of the I course at Clark College with Lorelle VanFossen.

Spring Quarter 2013-14

Here are the tips for future students taking the course from the Spring Quarter of 2013-14.

From Stephanie Billmyre:

Getting the opportunity to take a class like Lorelle’s WordPress (CTEC 160) is one you may not get twice, and the advantage should be seized to it’s full potential. Not only is the entire class environment absolutely amazing but, if you truly thrive for knowledge in WordPress writing, web development, css, html, social media, and marketing via the web and want to explore how to start AND MAINTAIN your very own site, then you will enjoy this class. My recommendations come from my own experiences are intended to ultimately encourage you to stick with the class until the very end!

Here is my advise:

  • Do not be shy in this class, it is a collaborative subject [MAKE A BUDDY]. If you do not work well in groups or on team projects then this class may not be for you.
  • Take only this class if your schedule will accommodate for it or take light alternatives to fill your schedule – there is a lot of work and you are expected to complete it.
  • Remember to keep an open mind and think outside of the box – ask for help.
  • Don’t blink; don’t miss ANY classes.

When you are done with class each day give your neighbor a high five; the entire group will need it after racing through the material and trying to capture the thousands of ideas coming your way as you explore all the wonderful opportunities of WordPress.

Continue reading WordPress I Class: Students Tell Students What They Need to Know

Some Beginner Don’ts for WordPress

I found the article, “Beginner WordPress Bloggers: 10 Things You Shouldn’t Do” by Tom Ewer to be very helpful for a new WordPress student and I’d like to highlight a few of the suggestions in my own collection of do and don’t tips for those new to WordPress, especially students in the Clark College WordPress classes. This comes from a student who can say “been there, done that, didn’t get a t-shirt.” 😀

Don’t Moderate Comments

By setting your comments to be moderated on your site, comments are held back until you approve them.

If you check frequently or use an email or mobile app to get notifications of comments waiting to be approved, this is okay, but it takes extra time and attention.

Moderating comments doesn’t prevent comment spam, and can prevent a lot of your viewers from coming back because the experience will be lacking compared to a live conversation. Your delay in approving moderated comments can frustrate the commenters.

By default, WordPress moderates new commenters by holding their first-time comments in moderation until you approve them. Once you have approved them, you are basically telling WordPress that they are okay people and their comments will not be moderated in the future.

To manage comment moderation in WordPress: Continue reading Some Beginner Don’ts for WordPress