Tag Archives: wordpress tutorials

Tutorial: How to Contribute to WordPress

Are you interested in becoming more involved in WordPress? There are various ways in which the extreme coding extraordinaire, or even the most amateur of bloggers, can be a part of WordPress.

What is Your Interest?

Your choices are as follows:

By selecting one of the teams above, you’ll see a blog that pertains to that topic and the opportunities listed in the top portion of that post (if available):

Screen Shot from WordPress.org with links and options of how to contribute to WordPress.

To join the Core Team to help with the development of the site, you must start by reading the Core Contributor Handbook, and following the instructions to ensure you’re qualified to apply.

There are many options that you could contribute to any of the teams. Not only do you have the possibility of diving in and getting your hands dirty, but you can also attend  weekly meetings hosted via Slack , or simply just subscribe to the posts.

Beside each recent post, there will be an option to subscribe and receive email updates each time a new post is published on that topic:

Screen shot of blog in WordPress.org under Core opportunites.

Opportunities are just a click away, depending upon how involved you’d like to be.

For More Information

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How to Use CSS to Stylize Headings in Your WordPress Content

So the extra-large font on the post titles and teeny-tiny text on the headings of Twenty Eleven are not doing it for you? This tutorial will show you how to spice up any theme headings using CSS and discuss the pros and cons of doing so.

Styling Headings with the WordPress Customizer or Appearance Settings

Maybe just changing the font and colors will be enough for you to style the headings.

Experiment with the WordPress Customizer settings in Appearance > Customize. It’s all automatic, so there is no need to know how to code CSS.

Pros: You can customize the appearance of your theme to your exact specifications, though the specifications maybe limited or constrained.

Cons: If you switch themes the fonts will carry over, but the CSS will not. You will also lose your customization if you upgrade your current theme for security reasons. Take a look at the Frequently Asked Questions about Customizer for all the other restrictions. Continue reading How to Use CSS to Stylize Headings in Your WordPress Content

WordPress Tutorial: Adding Comics To A Blog

If you are a cartoonist or artist, you may want to share your cartoons online in a way that they incorporate into your blog. Even if you do not draw pictures, you may want a way to showcase other images at the top of your blog. This tutorial will show you how to do this in both the Twenty-Eleven Theme, and the Panel Theme.

Setting Up Shop

Before we even decide on a theme, we need to make sure the digital images or digital images of comic strips are named properly, and include alternative text, or alt tags. This is important to do as you upload the media the first time, and make a habit out of it.
Continue reading WordPress Tutorial: Adding Comics To A Blog

WP News: WordPress 4.1, Blogging 201, and LoopConf

The Clark College WordPress class students review WordPress news around the world to bring you the latest news and WordPress resources during the academic year.

WordPress Development

WordPress Core Weekly: A summary of all the updates made to WordPress in the last week. Formerly known as Last Week In WordPress Core. Continue reading WP News: WordPress 4.1, Blogging 201, and LoopConf

WordPress Words: CSS

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a simple mechanism for adding style (e.g., fonts, colors, spacing) to Web documents.
World Wide Web Consortium (W3)

Example: “The CSS in this part of the code is not coded correctly. Are you sure that the color of that Page is correct in the CSS?”

According to the W3C (or World Wide Web Consortium), Cascading Style Sheets, or CSS, is a mechanism used in web development to style certain elements of a website. CSS originally applies to web coding alongside other languages, such as Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and JavaScript/jQuery/jQuery Mobile. Currently the latest version of CSS, CSS3, is being used for many websites today.

What is the history behind CSS development? In Chapter 20 of Cascading Style Sheets, designing for the Web by Håkon Wium Lie and Bert Bos, both Lie and Bos delineate the origins of CSS from 1994 to their present year in 1999. Looking back over twenty years ago, it is easy to see how much of a struggle it was to establish CSS as a fundamental part of web browsers and the construction of the World Wide Web in general. Continue reading WordPress Words: CSS