Tag Archives: design

Article: How to Design with Dyslexia in Mind

Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects 3-7% of the population, and up to 20% may have some degree of the symptoms. It is not an intelligence problem, but considered a cognitive disorder that primarily affects learning, memory, perception, and problem solving. Specifically, it impairs a person’s ability to read. As web designers, we need to be aware of the design choices we make so we don’t make it harder for people with dyslexia to read a website.

Dyslexia Design Decisions

When making design choices we need to consider the needs of the following two groups:

Dyslexic people who use computer speech output technology: Like many visually-impaired users, many dyslexics now rely on computers to read the text to them. Thus pages should be designed to be compatible with most screen readers. All important information should be conveyed in text, as computers can not read or interpret graphic images.

Dyslexics who need clear graphics and distortion-free text: Other dyslexic individuals, who are reading your site on their own, will appreciate clear, simple, and consistent graphic navigational icons. They will be troubled by flashing text, variations in fonts, distracting sounds or animations, and textured or patterned backgrounds.
Dyslexia

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Interview with Andrew Telegin

Andrew Telegin is an online editor for the Independent, the Clark College student newspaper.

Q: Do you like WordPress?

A: Yes, I really do enjoy WordPress. I think it is easy to use and fun to figure out with cool features. It has been an adventure, too.

Q: The Good and the Bad about WordPress?

A: To me, the good is how is it easy for someone new to catch on, learn, and use. I’m using WordPress.com in class and the bad is that you there is less customization of the back end and dashboard. All you can change is the colors and I would like to switch around some of the functions so they are not on the side bar and I cannot do that on WordPress.com but I can with the self-hosted version of WordPress, and we are using that on the college site.

While most of WordPress is easy-to-use and semi-intuitive, I really want to learn HTML and some basic web code to know more about how all these things work. While I’m not ready to dive fully into web programming, I know the brush with the code will help me in the future. We are into the web forever and I’m riding the wave.

Screenshot of front page of Clark College Independent.

Q: Have you worked with any other Content Management Software? What’s different?

A: I have briefly worked with SquareSpace and I do not recommend it. The menu’s are very confusing. I may have problems with learning WordPress, but it was worse there. Still, it is important to experiment with the variety of options we have out there. Continue reading Interview with Andrew Telegin

Interview with Daniel Payne

A Photo of Daniel PayneDaniel Payne of Tualatin Web has been developing commercial web sites since 1995 and programming since 1975. So it made sense to me to get some key insights from someone who has been in the business for a number of years.

Q: What made you decide to become a member of the WordPress community and to become involved in organizing the PDX WordPress meetups?

A: I first heard about WordPress in 2008, after I had already created and sold my own content management system, it become clear that the team at Automattic had a much superior product so I decided to focus on customizing WordPress for business users. Later on I signed up at MeetUp.com and then discovered the Portland WordPress Meetup group. After attending a few meetings I started to get more involved, and eventually became an organizer. I wanted to give something back to the WordPress community, and also at the same time raise awareness for my own web development company, Tualatin Web.

Q: How long have you been working with WordPress?

A: My first WordPress install was in 2008. I started coding web sites in 1995, and computer coding in 1975.

Q: What made you choose to use WordPress‘s CMS over other methods of content management systems?

A: I also looked at Joomla, Drupal, Concrete, Wix, etc. It seems like every month we have yet another CMS. WordPress was the most intuitive CMS to learn, use, and develop for. WordPress is also the #1 CMS in the world, so it makes most business sense to specialize on the leading tool. Continue reading Interview with Daniel Payne

WordPress Words: Theme

A Theme is a collection of files that work together to produce a graphical front-end interface with an underlying unifying design for a site. A WordPress Theme modifies the way the site is displayed and designed, without modifying the underlying core programming of WordPress. While some associate a WordPress Theme with “skinning” your site with a design, a WordPress Theme contains programming code that influences the design, changing it with each generated page view based upon the programming with PHP, WordPress template tags, WordPress conditional tags, and CSS.
WordPress Theme in WordPress Codex Glossary

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WordPress Words: Child Theme

A Child Theme is a Theme that inherits the functionality of another Theme, called the parent Theme. Child Themes allow you to modify, or add to the functionality of that parent Theme. A Child Theme is the best, safest, and easiest way to modify an existing Theme, whether you want to make a few tiny changes or extensive changes. Instead of modifying the Theme files directly, you can create a Child Theme and override within.
Child Themes – WordPress Codex

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Plugins: The Fancy Gallery Light

When you want to add a gallery to your page or post, the Fancy Gallery Light Plugin will help you to create a gallery where the images stand out.

Fancy Gallery Light

This Plugin will add all the pictures you want together, and create the correct HTML short code for the gallery to be added in the Text editor. All you will have to do is choose your images, size them, add alt text, and add the short code to the text editor, the plugin does the rest.
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Interview with Japh Thompson on WPWeekly

The WPWeekly Podcast (147) on WP Tavern featured an interview with Japh Thomson and his work at Envato. He worked in support before becoming the WordPress Evangelist for ThemeForest. The discussion covered the challenges of overcoming criticism in social media for a company with the best intentions for the WordPress Community. Other topics included new features in WordPress, WordPress News, and the WordPress Contributor Experience Survey.

Typography Matters

typographyYou may not think what you are writing on the web and the way it is written is important. But it is just as important to your web page and it’s graphics if not more. Typography (I’m talking about fonts, you rookie) speaks volumes and, in my opinion, is far more important than the visuals themselves sometimes. Now, I am not going to cover every definition of type from Humanist Sans to Geometric Sans. But, what I will say is typeface can inspire a feeling depending on weight, point size, and whether it has serifs or not.

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Extending Your WordPress Plugin

Ian Dunn discusses different ways to customize WordPress plugins without losing your changes after upgrades. The main takeaway is to use the functionality and Code Snippets plugins to create and manage changes. Additionally users are encouraged to get in touch with the plugin creator.

For more information checkout Ian Dunn’s article, “The Right Way to Customize a WordPress Plugin” and WordPress Tavern’s article, “How To Extend A WordPress Plugin Without Losing Your Changes.”

How to Create the “Perfect” Post – Part 2

Welcome to part two of two in this series on “How to Construct the “Perfect” Post.” Did you have a nice intermission?

Here in the second act we will cover the last few tips I have for you to make your content sing out like the proverbial fat lady. Remember, you may have composed the grandest aria ever but if your presentation is scrawny and slim, nobody can hear it. So let’s continue to make your presentation gloriously obese!

fat lady singing
So it’s over then?

No, no. We’re just getting started! Continue reading How to Create the “Perfect” Post – Part 2

WordPress Improves Human Time Difference

WordPress has improved the “Human Time Difference” feature that displays on posts. Up to 60 days the posts will say “Posted 33 days ago” as before, but on posts older then 60 days instead of “Posted 3 months ago” the line will now display the exact date it was posted on, rather then an arbitrary month count. Themes had individually done this before, but this has now become a WordPress standard.