Page and Post Authors

What Is an Author

An author is the person who is credited with writing a post or page on WordPress. By default, the author is set to the name of the logged-in user who originally created the post or page. In some themes, the author appears a a link to the users Gravatar biography, in others it may the biography as part of the page or post.

How to Select or Change Authors

Page and post authors may be changed from the edit screen on new pages/posts, or by editing existing ones (Admin Side Bar > Posts/Pages > All Posts/Pages, then click item to edit).

By default, the author selection menu is hidden. To unhide it, click Screen Options > Author.  The Author Menu is now added below the Visual/Text Editor (click-and-drag the menu title to move).

Screenshot showing the location of the Screen Options and Help menus in the upper-right of the Post Edit screen.

To change authors, click the drop-down selection menu:  Author > Selection. (Only one author selection is permitted; be sure to update or save).

Authorship may also be changed from the All Posts and All Pages screens, either by using Quick or Bulk Edit.

WordPress News for the Week

The following is the news articles from May 18th through May 22nd.

May 18th

  • Community, Translation, and Wapuu: How Japan is Shaping WordPress History. WP Tavern
  • A WordPress Veteran’s Take on DrupalCon LA. WP Tavern

May 19th

  • Automattic Acquires WooCommerce. WP Tavern
  • WordPress Cape Town to Host 2nd Annual Charity Hackathon in June. WP Tavern

May 20th

  • Happy Joe Partners with WebDevStudios, SiteGround and Announces Dates for WordPress BootCamps. WP Tavern
  • WordPress.org is Testing International Theme and Plugin Directories. WP Tavern

May 21st

  • Hookr Enters Beta with New UI and Support for 800+ Plugins and Themes. WP Tavern

May 22nd

  • How WordPress Business Owners are Benefiting from Publicly Sharing Revenue Stats. WP Tavern
  • Hello Security Plugin Aims to Educate WordPress Users on Web Security Best Practices. WP Tavern

WordPress.com Theme Submissions Suspended

It used to be that you could only submit a new theme for WordPress.com if they had invited you to. That all changed at the beginning of 2014 when WordPress.com announced that they would add a submission form to their site for anyone who would like to sell their themes.

How Theme Developers Feel

There have been mixed feelings about how well that has gone. Theme sellers are excited to have the opportunity to submit their themes freely, but at the same time, allowing so many people to submit themes is slowing down the approval time for the themes. That can cause some frustration among sellers.  Theme creator, Mike McAlister said on his own review of how WordPress.com submissions were going:

“I’m not talking about weeks long, I’m talking about months long. Each Array theme review has taken at least a month, usually longer. Our latest theme for WP.com, Camera, took 4 months from the day I submitted it to the day it was released.”

There have been other complaints with the new submission process as well, especially for people who design commercial themes. They are saying that WordPress.com is not spending enough time promoting the commercial themes. Some of them are abandoning their desire to sell to WordPress.com and are returning to other buyers like Themeforest.

What Automattic Says

Right now, this is what the theme submission page at WordPress.com says.

Screenshot of the submission page text for themes on WordPress.com.
When contacted about why it took down the theme submission option, Automattic said:A Screenshot of a quote that Automattic gave about why they took down their theme submission form.
While theme creators may be upset by the take down of the open theme submission form on WordPress.com, it should be helpful for them to realize that WordPress is working on getting the system updated so it won’t take so long for their themes to be approved. Automattic did not give a date on when their form will be available again.
Hat tip: WP Tavern

WordPress Words: Query

A query is a request of information from a database.
Webopedia.com.

Example: The database query retrieved the records of all employees who work more than 40 hours per week.

About The Word “Query”

Queries are most often used in SQL (structured query language), developed by IBM in 1974. This language allows a user controlled set of data to be returned from a very large collection of information.
SQL ANATOMY wiki
An example SQL query

WordPress also utilizes SQL in its own unique way, with a class called wpdb, which contains its own function to relate WordPress to a database. Using the object $wpdb, a sample query for use in WordPress would look like this:
sample wpdb query
Source: WordPress.org

For More Information

WordPress word: Gravatar

Gravatar is a free service for providing globally unique avatars. It is a type of avatar—an image or picture which represents an individual when they interact with websites, and is integrated it into the WordPress blogging platform.
Gravatar.com

About Gravatar

Gravatars were created by Tom Preston-Werner and has been ran and supported by a free service called Automattic since 2007. It’s included with every WordPress account, and always lets every user to authenticate themselves during login, comments are manage not only WordPress, but hundreds of other websites that use it.

“Gravatar” stands for Globally Recognized Avatar, because it works as a single person across multiple websites, removing the need for multiple separate accounts and bios. Prior to Gravatar and similar services, an avatar would included a person’s name. The picture and bios associated with their logon credentials on only a single site.

A gravatar is different than the similarly-named blavatar, which represents an individual blog—not a single person.

For More Information

WordPress Words: Widgets

Widget is a fancy word for tools or content that you can add, arrange, and remove from the sidebar(s) of your blog. Widgets make it easy to customize the content of your sidebar(s).
WordPress.com Support Page.

Example:

Sample of WordPress Widgets

About Widgets

You can benefit greatly by using widgets in your WordPress blog. To define them further, they are small boxes that contain a specific type of information or application for your users. You can install widgets into any area of your WordPress blog that has widget areas available. Some themes have more widget areas than others. You can add widgets to sidebars, footers, posts, and more. You can also make customized extra widget areas in your blog.

To learn how to install widgets into your WordPress sidebar, start with this video tutorial…

References

WordPress Tutorial: Adding Comics To A Blog

If you are a cartoonist or artist, you may want to share your cartoons online in a way that they incorporate into your blog. Even if you do not draw pictures, you may want a way to showcase other images at the top of your blog. This tutorial will show you how to do this in both the Twenty-Eleven Theme, and the Panel Theme.

Setting Up Shop

Before we even decide on a theme, we need to make sure the digital images or digital images of comic strips are named properly, and include alternative text, or alt tags. This is important to do as you upload the media the first time, and make a habit out of it.
Continue reading WordPress Tutorial: Adding Comics To A Blog

WordPress Words: Heading

The heading is simply like a title. In HTML, it is structured by using heading tags such as H1, H2, H3, and H4. Normally, as the heading number gets bigger, the font gets smaller.Tags are similar to, but more specific than, categories. The use of tags is completely optional.
WordPress.org Support

Example: A well placed heading can be used to change the separate topics in a post and structure my work.

For those of you who don’t know what a tag is. A HTML tag is:

An HTML tag is a code that describes how a Web page is formatted. HTML tags are defined by the characters < and >.

about tech

About Headings

The headings that we use in WordPress are HTML headings that separate content on your posts. Headings are important because they let the writer of the posts change topics or shift the post directions. They also let search engines the headings to find your posts and most importantly they structure the post you are writing. Most importantly they help you structure your post, giving it a change in direction or introducing a new topic or idea.

Headings can be used in both the editor options. In the visual editor the Headings tool looks something like this:

WordPress Heading in the visual editor

In the text editor, the Headings look like this:

WordPress headings in the text editor

Search Optimization

Headings also allow search engines to find your content. They often times view your headings and select them if they match a searched ramifications. This will help bring more traffic to your site.

For More Information

WordPress Words: Back-End

Of or relating to the part of a software system or online service that the user does not interact with and that is usually accessible only to programmers or administrators: back-end software.
The Free Dictionary.

Example 1: The  IT administrator logged in to the back-end of the program to change user permissions for the manager.
Example 2: Our company is seeking a Junior Full Stack Developer, who will work with back-end code, as well as front-end user interface design.

WordPress Back-End

With business software, the term back-end can refer to anything customers and most employees never see, such as database queries and code. With websites, the back-end is virtually anything not seen on the front-end by normal visitors to the site.

With WordPress however, the term back-end refers to something specific:

The back end is the area that authorized users can sign into to add, remove and modify content on the website. This may also be referred to as “WordPress”, “admin” or “the administration area”.
WordPress Codex Glossary.

The back-end of WordPress is primarily the administrator panel, but also includes anywhere you can post or modify content or settings.  When used as a verb rather than a noun, adding content is a back-end action which requires login and privileges on that blog. On the other hand, commenting, liking, and sharing are front-end actions available to site visitors.

A picture highlighting the main navigation of WordPress.com's back-end in red.
The WordPress.com Back-End

The Other Back-End

WordPress technically has more than one back-end. Users of WordPress.org open source software can modify settings in code to change the appearance and behavior if their installation of the software.

Example : A WordPress freelance developer modifies code on the back-end of the software to change the appearance of administrator panel for their client. The client has no access to the code, and modifies content by logging into their back-end: the administrator area. 

Additionally, the developers of WordPress software itself modify code within the software when they release new versions. For WordPress software developers, the front-end of their product is the administrator panel interface, since their primary audience is blog owners, while the blog owners primary audience is their blog visitors.

Example : WordPress.org hires back end developers to work on the code of their software. They release new versions, which website developers download and set up for their clients.

In the above example, each of these three persons have their own understanding of back-end access. One client’s back-end is another developer’s front-end.

For More Information

Interview with Danielle Baldwin: Social Media/Content Strategist, WordPress Developer

L.Danielle Baldwin

This is L. Danielle Baldwin. She is a Social Media/Content Strategist, WordPress Developer and The Founder of the very first WordCamp RDU in 2009.

Why did you start using WordPress?

I started using WordPress back in the day when it was called b2 cafelog around 2002. From there I have just followed the application and was able to watch it morph into what WordPress has become today. I started using it initially as a blogging tool but very soon after I got the hang of it, I started using it to create blogs for other people.

Website Whole Lotta Yadda by L. Danielle Baldwin - screenshot. Continue reading Interview with Danielle Baldwin: Social Media/Content Strategist, WordPress Developer

WordPress News: Automattic Buys Scroll Kit for Storytellers

According to Venture Beat, Automattic purchased Scroll Kit, a visual online editor for storytelling. According to Scoll Kit, “Our objective was to create a process for making the web that was more like drawing on a piece of paper.”

Scroll Kit is a drag and drop, multimedia content app that allows creation of visual stories online in a scrolling format. Scroll Kit arranges elements in layers so that objects can be placed on top of other objects

An example of how Scroll Kit works can be seen from Contently.com on a feature story called “Brooklyn Took It” and the New York Times Snow Fall.

Information and tutorials on how to use Scroll Kit may be found from Mariam Posner and in the Pharrell interview on Complex.

Interview with Daniel Payne

A Photo of Daniel PayneDaniel Payne of Tualatin Web has been developing commercial web sites since 1995 and programming since 1975. So it made sense to me to get some key insights from someone who has been in the business for a number of years.

Q: What made you decide to become a member of the WordPress community and to become involved in organizing the PDX WordPress meetups?

A: I first heard about WordPress in 2008, after I had already created and sold my own content management system, it become clear that the team at Automattic had a much superior product so I decided to focus on customizing WordPress for business users. Later on I signed up at MeetUp.com and then discovered the Portland WordPress Meetup group. After attending a few meetings I started to get more involved, and eventually became an organizer. I wanted to give something back to the WordPress community, and also at the same time raise awareness for my own web development company, Tualatin Web.

Q: How long have you been working with WordPress?

A: My first WordPress install was in 2008. I started coding web sites in 1995, and computer coding in 1975.

Q: What made you choose to use WordPress‘s CMS over other methods of content management systems?

A: I also looked at Joomla, Drupal, Concrete, Wix, etc. It seems like every month we have yet another CMS. WordPress was the most intuitive CMS to learn, use, and develop for. WordPress is also the #1 CMS in the world, so it makes most business sense to specialize on the leading tool. Continue reading Interview with Daniel Payne

Interview with Barbara Rozgonyi

Barbara RozgonyiBarbara Rozgonyi leads CoryWest Media, a strategic marketing consultancy that attracts attention, builds brands, and connects communities in three dimensions: digitally, directly and dynamically via the wiredPRworks system.

An MPI Chicago member since April 2013, Barbara serves on the MarComm committee and was nominated for the chapter’s 2013-14 “Tomorrow’s Leader Award.”

A recognized social media industry thought leader, Barbara founded Social Media Club Chicago, a leading global chapter, in October 2008. In 2013, Nokia selected Barbara as one of two U.S. reporters to cover Social Media Week Berlin.

Barbara is a frequent keynote speaker, an accomplished corporate trainer, and an experienced educator who develops marketing and communications programs for events, colleges, associations, corporations and online communities. In 2013, Barbara created her first online course for college students called “Get Linked Into College Success and Beyond.”

Barbara’s media mentions include Crain’s Chicago Business, Inc.com, American Express OpenForum, BusinessAdvisor.com, HuffingtonPost, WDCB, WIND, NFIB.com, LowesForPros.com, LawMarketing.com, Mashable, Germanys FAZ, Chicago Tribune, and NBC5.

As publisher of WiredPRWorks.com, launched in June 2006, Barbara’s work is often a catalyst for innovative and creative marketers. She is redefining PR as Personality + Reputation.

An author, Barbara contributed the LinkedIn chapter to the best-seller, “Success Secrets of the Social Media Marketing Superstars.” In 2015, Barbara will be featured as the PR expert in a new book written by the world’s leading online marketing superstars. To tap into WIRED PR marketing ideas and resources, visit Barbara’s top 50 marketing and PR blog, wiredPRworks.

When did you start using WordPress?

I started using WordPress for my business in June 2006, two years after I started teaching blogging for business. It took me two years to get up the courage to publish my first post. In my classes, I used a demo WordPress site with pictures of my cat sleeping in a pile of Beanie Babies. In July 2007, I switched from the WordPress.com platform to wiredPRworks.com, a self-hosted blog. Continue reading Interview with Barbara Rozgonyi

Students Serving Up WordPress Tips and Techniques for Clark College Students and the World

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